Policy

CMS proposed to expand reimbursement for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) to patients with suspected masked hypertension while continuing to cover it for those with white coat hypertension.

AMGA, a trade association focused on improving healthcare throughout the United States, has issued a statement in opposition to legislation being considered by Congress that would limit self-referrals in numerous specialties, including imaging.

From HMOs to ACOs to the several arms of CMS’s Quality Payment Program (QPP), policymakers have been pushing healthcare providers to achieve better outcomes for less dollars—i.e., to improve value—for generations now.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) published a position paper April 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, voicing their discontent with recent federal actions to weaken the Affordable Care Act and offering seven recommendations on how to improve it.

As a response to new breast cancer screening guidelines shared by the American College of Physicians (ACP), the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) has issued a statement reaffirming its belief that women should undergo annual screening using mammography beginning at the age of 40.

New legislation has been introduced to Congress that would update Medicare policies by preventing self-referrals related to advanced imaging services, radiation therapy, anatomic pathology and physical therapy.

In 2017, some 60 percent of physicians reported being “not at all familiar” or “slightly familiar” with MACRA. A meager 8 percent said they were “very familiar” with the legislation. Two years later, anecdotal evidence strongly suggests the lack of understanding persists.

Too often in the national opioid epidemic, the resources have seemed ample where the need is slim—and vice versa. The hunch has been confirmed by a study conducted at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston and published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

When the American College of Physicians (ACP) shared new breast cancer screening guidelines, recommending that women with no symptoms begin undergoing mammograms every other year at the age of 50, both professional imaging societies and individual radiologists came out against the decision.

A final rule issued by CMS on April 5 cemented policies to increase plan choices and benefits for enrollees in the Medicare Advantage (MA) and Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit (Part D) programs, opening those beneficiaries to supplemental services like telehealth and streamlining the appeals process for those unsatisfied with their healthcare.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) now recommends that average-risk women with no symptoms undergo breast cancer screening with mammography every other year, beginning at the age of 50. The ACP explained its decision through a new guidance statement published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Amid a national debate over whether or not to dissolve the Affordable Care Act entirely or keep parts of the law intact, research presented at the American Heart Association’s QCOR Scientific Sessions on April 5 suggests Medicaid expansion contributed to a significant decline in cardiovascular-related deaths in recent years.