News

A year ago, U.S. military researchers presented an algorithm that can tell an individual how much caffeine to consume, and when, to achieve optimal alertness. Now they’ve turned the technique into a freely available tool for “designing effective strategies to maximize alertness while avoiding excessive caffeine consumption.”

A jury has awarded a young patient $11.5 million in a medical malpractice lawsuit filed against a radiologist at Boston’s Newton-Wellesley Hospital. 

Researchers have found that a new class of radiotracer can be used to identify 28 different types of malignant tumors, sharing their findings in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Mammography clinics are getting creative these days in an effort  to make breast screening a little more appealing. Massage chairs and goody bags are only a few of the ways imaging providers are trying to make the experience more positive.

Utilizing the ultrafast scan mode for CT imaging in the emergency department (ED) can significantly reduce motion artifacts, reported a team of Japan-based researchers in a study published by the American Journal of Roentgenology.

An analysis of PARTNER 2 data, published in the June edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, suggests transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) within failed bioprosthetic surgical aortic valves is a viable long-term solution for high-risk individuals, with patients seeing “excellent” functional and quality of life outcomes three years after the procedure.

A new automated detection tool using deep learning can detect clinically significant brain aneurysms on CT angiography (CTA) examinations, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open.

The FDA is responsible for regulating AI solutions designed and developed to provide care for patients, a task that leads to certain unique challenges.

A Wisconsin high schooler is speaking up for stroke awareness after she suffered a stroke of her own during gym class, WAOW reported—an event her doctors said was brought on by her birth control pills.

A jury awarded $11.5 million to a woman from Framingham, Massachusetts, in a medical malpractice suit filed against a radiologist in the state, which argued he was negligent in not adequately identifying a heart problem that eventually led to permanent brain damage, according to the Boston Globe.

Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy often share word of their adverse reactions to the drugs in online health forums. Researchers at Stanford have used natural language processing to mine these posts, accurately flagging detrimental side effects well before clinical journals advise caution.

Mistakes are inevitable in radiology, and even the most careful specialists face the very real risk of being implicated in a medical malpractice claim.