Advanced Visualization

The new platform, affectionately called ‘Herman,' analyzes complex patterns in images of pathogen and human cell interactions, and can do so in a fraction of the time normally required.

An international group of researchers found evidence of unique patterns of brain activity that may explain the neurological difference between consciousness and unconsciousness, according to a Feb. 6 study published in Science Advances.

Researchers used in vivo, two-photon imaging to identify a blood-clotting protein responsible for destroying the synapses in the brain—a precursor to cognitive decline, according to a Feb. 5 study published in Neuron.

With the help of PET scans, researchers have found women’s brains appear to be three years younger than men’s. The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may explain why women tend to remain mentally sharper longer than men.

At JFK Medical Center in Edison, New Jersey, patients can have a 360-degree, three-dimensional (3D) tour of the inside of their own bodies before surgery with the help of virtual reality technology at the center's Neuroscience Institute, USA Today’s MyCentralJersey.com reported on Jan. 31.

A new three-dimensional (3D) imaging technique to analyze tissue samples allowed scientists to determine that pancreatic cancers can start and grow in two distinct ways, according to a Jan. 30 study published in Nature. The findings solve a question that’s plagued researchers for decades.

A team of U.S. researchers used fMRI to discover that a lack of sleep can reduce the brain's ability to combat pain, according to a Jan. 28 study published in the journal JNeurosci.

Using fMRI, a team of researchers discovered combat veterans with severe post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) demonstrate distinct patterns in how their brain and body respond to learning danger and safety. The study may help explain why some experience more severe symptoms than others.

Researchers at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois have developed a noninvasive, three-dimensional (3D) imaging tool able to capture blood flow and oxygenation within the capillaries of a human, according to research published in the journal Light: Science & Applications. The technique could help detect conditions from headaches to cardiovascular disease, sooner.

Researchers at Boston University in Massachusetts have developed an imaging technique that, by using a photograph captured with a digital camera, can reconstruct the position of an opaque object and its surroundings when both are out of direct sight, according to a recent report by Nature

The technology can capture three-dimensional (3D) images of the entire human body at one bed position and requires 40-times less radiation than current methods, according to a recent press release.

Four-dimensional (4D) MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) sequencing is a reliable method for localizing parathyroid lesions, reported authors of a single-center study published in the European Journal of Radiology.